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Minnesota Tint Laws

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United States Window Tint Laws

Minnesota Tint Laws

Minnesota window tint laws for cars were first passed well over 30 years ago back in 1988. In the subsequent years, Minnesota tint laws have not been intensely overhauled, but many new auto window tint products have been released, such as nanoceramic car window film (originally developed for the aerospace industries), window tints with wide varieties of shades and hues, films that block UV and IR solar energy without darkening windows, and more.

To stay in line with Minnesota tint laws, therefore, it’s not only important to know what the law says about window tint for cars but also to understand the basics of vehicle window tint. To that end, you need to know about visible light transmission, or VLT, above all else. VLT refers to how much of the visible sunlight spectrum can pass through glass (and tint there applied), which effectively means how light or dark and therefore how transparent or opaque the window is. The darker (and more private) the car window, the lower the VLT% is, so 5% VLT, also known as limo tint, is very dark and very private.

Understanding VLT percent is so important because in Minnesota window tint tickets for illegally dark window film can cost hundreds of dollars, and police officers can test window tint VLT on the scene with handheld devices, so any traffic stop could be compounded by a tint violation ticket.

Please note: The accuracy, completeness, adequacy or currency of the content is not warranted or guaranteed. We are not lawyers or a law firm and we do not provide legal advice. We recommend you consult a lawyer or other appropriate professional if you want legal advice.

CLICK ON INDICATORS TO VIEW TINT LAWS FOR SPECIFIC WINDOWS

laws for suvs, trucks, & vans

Tint Laws for Trucks, SUVs. and Vans

Front Windows

All Vehicles

50% Tint (VLT%)

Rear Passenger Windows

Includes rear window and rear passenger

Any shade of tint can be used for trucks, SUVs, and vans ONLY

Rear Window

Includes rear window and rear passenger windows

Any shade of tint can be used for trucks, SUVs, and vans ONLY

Windshield Visor

ALL VEHICLE TYPES

Minnesota prohibits any tint from being applied to the windshield.

laws for sedans & coupes

Tint laws in the United States for Sedans & Coupes

Front Windows

ALL VEHICLE TYPES

Includes Trucks, SUVs, Vans, Sedans, Coupes, & Hatchbacks

50% Tint (VLT%)

Rear Passenger Windows

for Sedans, Coupes, & Hatchbacks

50% Tint (VLT%)

Rear Window

for Sedans, Coupes, & Hatchbacks

50% Tint (VLT%)

Windshield Visor

ALL VEHICLE TYPES

Minnesota prohibits any tint from being applied to the windshield.

Car with no tintWindow with Tint

% of Tint or Visible light transmission (VLT) is the measurement used to assess the amount of light passing through a piece of glass. This is the percent of visible light that passes through the film and glass to give you a net transmission percentage. The lower the VLT%, the darker the window.

Law Enforcement uses a tint meter which measures the Visible Light Transmittance (VLT) of window film and glass for illegal tint. 

Windshield: Several states allow medical exemptions for drivers or passengers who frequently travel in the vehicle. These exemptions usually require a licensed physician in that state to sign a waiver. Please visit your states .gov site for details. 

AS-1 Line: This is the line extending from the letters AS-1, found on most motor vehicle windshields, running parallel to the top of the windshield.

 

Minnesota Statutes section 169.71: Windshield.

U.S. Exemption For VLT

Click above to download the Nationwide Medical Exemptions Window Tinting Directory.

If you’re driving a truck or SUV built in the last decade, chances are it’s equipped with factory tinted glass on all windows behind the front doors.

Many owners of vehicles like this often choose to only have the front windows tinted to match the back because they believe that they are already set with the rear windows.

UV Protection

While this factory tint improves the looks of the vehicle, and offers rear passengers some privacy, it does very little to help reduce the heat entering through the glass or protect them from the sun’s harmful UV rays. 

Heat Rejection

The same also goes for heat rejection. Some assume that the level of heat rejection they will on the front glass is already present in the rear glass because of the factory tint. Nothing can be further from the truth. Other than having the tinted look, these windows do very little to stop the heat.

To find out what options you have to protecting your passengers and vehicles interior, click here.